Poster Session

The Roberson Project invites undergraduate and graduate students, public historians, preservationists, and community organizers to submit proposals for a poster session at our October Memory Works symposium.

The symposium will spotlight the ongoing initiatives of community organizations, colleges, and universities, often in innovative partnerships, to identify and confront the legacies of slavery that still resonant in their local environments. It will bring together community organizers, scholars, and students in a small and friendly setting designed for generating conversations, sharing experiences, and workshopping new approaches to commemoration in a region that still reflects a century of fealty to the “Lost Cause.”

Proposed posters should address research, curricular and other campus activities, or community organizing that connects with the symposium theme of how "memory works"  to preserve or disrupt slavery’s legacies in memory and commemoration. Applicants for the Poster Session should submit proposals, including a 250-word abstract and 100-word maximum brief bio

Selected presenters will receive travel funding to attend the symposium. All submissions are due no later than September 6, 2022.

Have questions about the poster session? Contact Dr. Andrew Maginn (Senior Research Associate & Program Coordinator) at awmaginn@sewanee.edu 

Have other questions about the Symposium? Contact Kathleen Solomon (Program Manager, Legacies of American Slavery Initiative) 

The Memory Works Symposium is sponsored by the Roberson Project on Slavery, Race, and Reconciliation at the University of the South, and in its role as one of seven Regional Collaboration Partners in the Legacies of American Slavery Network, a multiyear program under the direction of the Council of Independent Colleges and the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale University’s Macmillan Center. The symposium is made possible through the generous support of the Mellon Foundation. Additional support comes from the Center for Southern Studies at the University of the South.